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Nathan Mantel Papers 1939-2002 (bulk 1941-1994)
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Collection Scope and Content Note


Correspondence, reprints, drafts, statistical data, reports, and legal testimonies document Nathan Mantel's career as a medical statistician with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and later as a professor at George Washington University and American University. He worked primarily in area of analyzing the health effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental conditions. The bulk of the collection primarily consists of subject files and analytic data reports from NCI, GWU, and his consulting practice.

Series 1, Personal and Biographical, holds primarily personal correspondence and a set of CVs and resumes. Brief autobiographical information is provided by some anecdotal notes and a description of Mantel's experiences with the War Production Board before joining NCI. The Miscellaneous Information folder contains obituaries, biographical articles, and his last will and testament. Included also are Mantel's thesis proposal and thesis for the master's degree he earned at American University in 1956. Personnel records in Series II include positions descriptions and performance plans.

Series 2, National Cancer Institute, consists primarily of correspondence and subject files, the substance of which often concerns dialogues between Mantel and internationally-based colleagues on the development and interpretation of statistical models and methods. NCI administrative records contained in the collection are most complete in the form of Mantel's travel documents and his personnel records. NCI meeting minutes, appointment calendars, telephone messages, and other information are fragmentary. Files representing Mantel's participation in professional conferences and meetings are often limited to programs and schedules. The Notes and Data subseries are analytical records largely without contextual documentation or date.

Series 3, University of Pittsburgh, is a small series representing Mantel's teaching during the end of his time at NCI. It consists of very sparse correspondence and some undated lectures, test questions, and coursework.

Series 4, George Washington University, consists primarily of correspondence and subject files. Smaller subseries document grant funding which supported Mantel's position at GWU, notes and data that mostly lack description, and information about conferences that Mantel attended. His teaching is represented by a few lecture topics.

Series 5, American University, is primarily general correspondence. Limited teaching, grant support, and administrative records are included.

Series 6, Consulting Work, contains correspondence, testimony, affidavits, reports, and printed information relating to his analytical work understanding the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental conditions on behalf of private industry, interest groups, and government agencies. Topics include pesticides, vaccines, airborne chemicals, effects of smoking, effects of alcohol, food additives, and medications. Arranged alphabetically by topic or substance, each subseries typically contains correspondence between Mantel and a corporate entity, background material on the substance in question, Mantel's reports, and sometimes his and others' legal testimony.

Series 7, Writings, is devoted mostly to Mantel's contributions to medical statistical literature. Arranged between seemingly unpublished articles and articles arranged according to Mantel's numbered bibliography, many of the files contain not only reprint versions but also preliminary drafts and correspondence between Mantel, his co-authors, and publishers. Smaller subseries contain collected writings by others which address Mantel's work or which have been signed by their authors.

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